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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

1 edition of Security implications of US arms transfer to China found in the catalog.

Security implications of US arms transfer to China

Jer Donald Get

Security implications of US arms transfer to China

by Jer Donald Get

  • 364 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Naval Postgraduate School, Available from the National Technical Information Service in Monterey, Calif, Springfield, Va .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Pagination184 p.
Number of Pages184
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25493185M

  First, China sells military equipment at much lower prices that the United States, which for some types of equipment (and some sellers) is ideal. Second, China will sell to just about any customer. That we defer action on the FX and arms package issues until the next Administration when they can be considered in the context of the broader China policy. 3 Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, Office, Meetings File, Unfiled Files, Box , China: 10/77–1/

Like the United States, Russian arms exports grew during the past five-year period, but only by percent. Moscow accounted for 23 percent of global exports, providing arms to 50 countries as well as rebel forces in Ukraine. India accounted for 38 percent of Russian exports, with Vietnam and China importing an additional 11 percent each.   The sale of American-made weapons to the global community is surging ahead, with the United States controlling nearly one-third of all military-grade arms Author: Carlo Muñoz.

This thesis will analyze three significant international arms transfer cases involving combat aviation assets since Septem The cases all fall under the legal umbrella of the Arms Export Control Act, Title 22 of US Code, which excludes arms transfers completed under covert or other legal authorities. The cases include: theAuthor: Rob Arnett. China’s role as an arms exporter to the Arab world is among the many uncertainties tainting Chinese foreign policy, due to the secretive nature of arms deals. China is the world’s third largest exporter of arms, behind the United States and Russia, representing around % of global trade for conventional major arms.


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Security implications of US arms transfer to China by Jer Donald Get Download PDF EPUB FB2

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Open Library. Security implications of US arms transfer to China. By Jer Donald Get. Download PDF (10 MB) Abstract. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimitedThis thesis is an evaluation of the soundness of the Reagan administration's policy for transferring arms to the People Republic of China, with a sound policy defined as one in which the Author: Jer Donald Get.

Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers, Technology and Science Music, Full text of "Security implications of US arms transfer to China." See other formats. Security Implications of US Arms Transfers to China by Jer Donald Get Major, United States Army ".S.

United States Military Academy, Submitted in partial fulfillment of the, requirements for the degree of HAS'ER O17 ARTS IN NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS from the N; V/' I Pc•'1C A] ;UATE SC-COl,1 T) e Author. Conventional Arms Transfers and US Economic Security Strategic Studies Quarterly ♦ Spring 43 Transfer (CAT) policy.1 The president has been especially interested in the economic implications of arms transfers, and they are, indeed, worth a good deal.

See Congressional Research Service, Implications of President Carter's Conventional Arms Transfer Policy: Report to the Committee on Foreign Relations United States Senate, 95th Cong., 1st sess. that a willingness to retaliate more strongly would force the United States to recon - sider its commitment to Taiwan.

This chapter critically evaluates both proposed policy shifts. In the pages that follow, we present a simple framework for thinking through the broader implications of US arms sales for the cross- Strait relationship.

Arms sales and defense trade are key tools of foreign policy with potential long-term implications for regional security. For this reason, the United States takes into account political, military, economic, arms control, and human rights conditions in making decisions on the provision of military equipment and the licensing of direct commercial.

By contrast, Shichor ( Shichor (, a suggests that Chinese reliance on Israeli arms was in decline from the late s, meaning that us condemnation of Israel's arms sales to China during.

On Apthe President issued National Security Presidential Memorandum, approving a new and updated U.S. Conventional Arms Transfer (CAT) Policy to support Allies and partners, expand opportunities for American industry and create American jobs, and maintain U.S.

national security while thoroughly reviewing arms transfers to ensure that they are in the U.S. interest. U.S. Security Policy in Asia: Implications for China-U.S. Relations, paper by Wu Xinbo, Visiting Fellow, Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies, SeptemberAuthor: Wu Xinbo. The Foreign Military Sales (FMS) program is a form of security assistance authorized by the Arms Export Control Act (AECA), as amended [22 U.S.C.

et. seq.] and a fundamental tool of U. 10 "EXPORT CONTROLS: State and Commerce Should Share Watch List Information If Proposed Rules to Transfer Firearms Are Finalized," Government Accountability Office, GAO, March 1, For more information on a number of these concerns, see also "Proposed Firearms Export Changes: Key Challenges for U.S.

Oversight," Center for International Policy: Colby Goodman. Explaining China’s Arms Transfers 9 equipment, decontamination agents, and precursors to Iranian military organizations in and • U.S.

intelligence reports leaked to the press indicate China may have sold Iran dual-use equipment and vaccines for biological weapons.6 • China has transferred nuclear technology and know-how to. Why the Arms Trade Treaty Matters – and Why It Matters That the US Is Walking Away.

by Pablo Arrocha Olabuenaga. May 8, export and transfer of conventional arms. About Us. Just Security is based at the Reiss Center on Law and Security at New York University School of Law.

collectively, the United States and Russia made 52% of all arms transfer agreements with developing nations, ($ billion in current dollars). Inthe United States ranked first in arms transfer agreements with developing nations with $ billion or 41% of these agreements.

In second place was France with $ billion orFile Size: 1MB. Download Transcript The Trump Administration released its new Conventional Arms Transfer (CAT) policy and Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) export policy in April It constitutes the first update to the CAT policy since January Please join CSIS as we host a public event to discuss the Administration’s new CAT policy.

The event will commence with keynote remarks by Acting Assistant. The Trump administration recently released its new Conventional Arms Transfer (CAT) policy designed to increase the already well-established U.S. dominance of the global arms market.

Increasing arms exports is seen as an important part of the administration’s aim to strengthen America’s economy and security.

China is the world’s sixth largest arms importer in and accounted for % of the global total. Pakistan recorded a 39% dip in arms imports in compared towith the US becoming “increasingly reluctant” to provide military aid or sell arms to Pakistan.

US arms exports to Pakistan fell 81% between and. China has clearly signaled to Europe that it does not shy away from involvement in Africa, historically Europe’s area of influence.

But the nature of China’s direct investment flows to the Author: Alicia Garcia Herrero. China said it has begun preparations to join an international arms control treaty that the United States has threatened to abandon, while also warning .Freely accessible online, it aims to provide valid, reliable and consistent data about the volume and types of major weapons transferred internationally since and provides tools to identify trends and patterns in international arms transfers at the global, regional and national levels, and relationships between arms importers and exporters.