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Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

1 edition of Economics of Douglas-fir tussock moth control found in the catalog.

Economics of Douglas-fir tussock moth control

Economics of Douglas-fir tussock moth control

an analysis using the combined stand prognosis/Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreak model and the FORPLAN linear programming model on the Clearwater and Malheur National Forests

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Pest Management in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas fir tussock moth -- Control -- Clearwater National Forest (Idaho),
  • Douglas fir tussock moth -- Control -- Malheur National Forest (Or.),
  • Forest management -- Clearwater National Forest (Idaho),
  • Forest management -- Malheur National Forest (Or.)

  • Edition Notes

    StatementWayne E. Bousfield ... [et al.]
    ContributionsBousfield, Wayne E, United States. Forest Pest Management
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 36 p. :
    Number of Pages36
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14840427M

    Douglas-fir, white fir, and grand fir are all equally acceptable. In the south (California, Nevada, Arizona, and Figure 1. -- Distrubution of host type where Douglas-fir tussock moth may be found and location of outbreaks. trees, brush, and buildings, but once an outbreak subsides, finding caterpil-lars is difficult. Defoliation by the tussock moth. For control of Douglas Fir Tussock Moths: In landscape plantings, pyrethroids such as permethrin (Astro), cyfluthrin (Tempo), bifenthrin (Talstar, Onyx) and lambda-cyhalothrin (Scimitar) are effective against Douglas-fir tussock moth caterpillars.

    Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Control by the Homeowner The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseuclot-sugata, is one of the most injurious insect pests of Douglas-fir and true firs found in the West. Out-breaks may develop explosively and when they do, the caterpillars will attack less preferred species such as pine, larch, spruce, and other species. Parasite records for the Douglas-fir tussock moth (General technical report PNW) [Torolf R Torgersen] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Torolf R Torgersen.

    deals in some way with either the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), or a related species. Specifically, publications and 82 unpublished documents make some reference, at least, to the Douglas-fir tussock moth; 55 are concerned with other species in the same genus. The caterpillars of the Douglas-fir Tussock moth chew on the needles of spruces, douglas fir, and true firs. The young caterpillars have long black/grey hair turning brightly colored as they mature. A mature larva is inches long with a grayish brown body and a black head. The moth spends the winter as an egg within an egg mass.


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Economics of Douglas-fir tussock moth control Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Economics of Douglas-fir tussock moth control: an analysis using the combined stand prognosis/Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreak model and the FORPLAN linear programming model on the Clearwater and Malheur National Forests. [Wayne E Bousfield; United States. Forest Pest Management.;].

Orgyia pseudotsugata (Douglas-fir tussock moth) is a moth of the subfamily Lymantriinae found in western North America.

Its population periodically irrupts in cyclical caterpillars feed on the needles of Douglas fir, true fir, and spruce in summer, and moths are on the wing from July or August to : Erebidae. The hairs from tussock moth caterpillars break off easily and may cause skin or respiratory irritation.

The preferred hosts are Douglas-fir and fir, but also include spruce, pine, and larch. The larvae feed mainly on forest trees and are infrequent pests in the landscape.

The Lymantriinae (formerly called the Lymantriidae) are a subfamily of moths of the family Erebidae. Many of its component species are referred to as "tussock moths" of one sort or another. The caterpillar, or larval, stage of these species often has a distinctive appearance of alternating bristles and haired : Insecta.

Tussock Moth Control Tussock moth control is an important component of any property owner in urban Colorado. The Douglas Fir tussock moth is a common pest in Colorado. The Tussock moth caterpillar (Orgyia psuedotsugata) eat the needles of spruce, Douglas fir, and true fir trees.

These caterpillars cause defoliation, which occurs rapidly from. The Douglas-fir tussock moth, O. pseudotsugata, feeds primarily on Douglas-fir and true firs. Lighter-colored tufts of hair along the back, red spots on top, and an orange stripe along each side distinguish its mature larvae from those of the rusty tussock moth.

Life cycle. Tussock moths overwinter as eggs. Douglas-Fir tussock moth has been most prevalent in our landscape trees but is also in forested areas on Cheyenne Mountain and on Rampart Range Road. Spruce budworm has surged in forested areas such as Cheyenne Cañon, Cheyenne Mountain and along Rampart Range Road.

It can also move into our landscape Spruce and Fir trees. The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a common and periodically destructive solitary defoliator. Occasionally, localized outbreaks occur on individual or small groups of Douglas-fir or spruce in urban settings both on the coast and in the interior.

Severe defoliation by the tussock moth may result in tree mortality, top-kill or weakened trees, making. How Does the Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Kill Trees.

Douglas-fir tussock moths are defoliators—they eat the leaves off of plants. More precisely, immature caterpillars climb to the top of the tree or building where they hatched, spin a silk web to sail on, float on the wind until they land, and eat any leaves they can find.

Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Orgyia pseudotsugata Key Wildlife Value: The Douglas-fir tussock moth creates snags and down wood by severely defoliating and causing the death of all sizes of true fir and Douglas-fir trees.

It also interacts with other disturbance agents, especially bark beetles, to cause host tree mortality. Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a native defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and true firs (Abies spp.), though will rarely feed on planted Colorado blue spruce in urban moth is a native species found throughout mixed-conifer forests in the western United States and southern British Columbia.

Tussock moths in the genus Orgyia are small moths that are best-known because of their attractive larvae. Figure 1. Fir tussock moth (Orgyia detrita) caterpillar (dorsal view).

Photograph by Donald W. Hall, University of Florida. Douglas-fir tussock moth occur in several Front Range communities. Less commonly it occurs as a forest pest in Colorado. Numerous natural enemies attack Douglas-fir tussock moth and these will often control outbreaks after a season or two.

Several insecticides can be used to control Douglas-fir tussock moth during outbreaks. Much of the infected area has been logged to salvage the dead and damaged timber. The purpose of this study was to determine the economic impact of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, the control program and the salvage logging on private recreation businesses in the area of the tussock moth : William Roy Williams.

Douglas-fircan cause problems because the larval hairs tussockMovement of Douglas-fir tussock moth into moth during outbreaks. ©Colorado State University Extension. 3/ Revised 7/ Caterpillars of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), chew the needles of spruces, Douglas fir and true firs.

Orgyia pseudotsugata. Pest description and crop damage Mature larvae are about 1 inch long, hairy, gray or light brown, with black heads.

Several light brown or cream-color tufts of hair are on the body. Defoliate trees. Also attacks Douglas-fir, true firs, pine, and larch.

Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Biology and Life Cycle (PDF) Douglas-fir Tussock Moth and Tussockosis (PDF) Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Treatment and Control In My Backyard (PDF) Douglas-fir Tussock Moth NPV Virus Information Sheet (PDF) History of Douglas-fir Tussock Moth in South-East BC (PDF) DFTM Treatment Maps; Back to Douglas-fir Tussock Moth.

The Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth Treatment and Control In Your Backyard. Douglas-fir tussock moth mature larva (caterpillar) The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a native insect. in the low-lying, dry belt Douglas-fir regions of southern British Columbia. It is. The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), is an important defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir, true fir and other conifers in the Rocky Mountain region.

Feeding by the larvae can cause complete defoliation of heavily infested trees. Damage usually appears first in the tops of trees and progresses downward, sometimes over several years. Surviving stands are invariably in a weakened state, and very susceptible to other insects (such as the Douglas-Fir Beetle) and onally, about 20% of people and animals are allergic to Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth hairs.

These hairs are present on the larvae, the cast larval skins, the egg masses, the cocoons, and the female moth. Treatment Options for Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth About Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a defoliator of Douglas-fir, true fir (Abies spp.) and spruce (Engelmann and Colorado blue) trees.

Native to Colorado’s forests, the insect also may impact Colorado blue spruce in urban settings.th0 Douglas fir tussock moth in the Pacific fior4hwe/t A SEMINAR SEMINAR CHAIRMAN Henry J. Korp Deputy Assistant Administrator for Pesticide Programs U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency PROGRAM COMMITTEE Roger Pierpont, Entomologist Ecological Effects Branch, Criteria and Evaluation Division Office of Pesticide Programs, U.S. Environmental .Douglas-fir tussock moth mature larva (caterpillar) Male Douglas-fir tussock moth The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a native insect in the low-lying, dry belt Douglas-fir regions of southern British Columbia.

It is not an introduced species. It feeds primarily on Douglas-fir, and occasionally on ponderosa pine and western larch. Ornamental spruce.